PJ Storytime!

On Thursday night, we enjoyed a PJ Storytime at the library, which surprisingly turned into two PJ Storytimes when a second group came in! I chose a few bedtime stories, then the kids got to choose books from the ones I displayed (which all came from our “Stories & Rhymes” picture book cagegory). They chose some good ones!

The ones I chose were:

So Sleepy Story by Uri Shulevitz– This was the first time I read this one in a storytime, and everyone liked it. It’s such a cute book, and it kind of reminded me of Goodnight Moon.

Someone’s Sleepy by Deborah Lee Rose– This one’s so good for the younger kids, and since we had a mixture of ages, it worked out very well!

Sleepyheads by Sandra J. Howatt– I love the illustrations in this book, AND we got to look at where different types of animals go to sleep!

…and the kiddos chose these ones!

Time for Bed, Fred! by Vasmeen Ismail– A cute puppy story that had the kids laughing.

Bedtime for Monsters by Ed Vere– This is one of my favorite bedtime/monster stories ever! I get to use spooky voices, and it’s just so funny. There were lots of giggles both times I read this one!

Sleep Tight, Little Mouse by Mary Morgan– Another cute story that showed us where different types of animals sleep

The Stuffed Animals Get Ready for Bed by Alison Inches– WILD stuffed animals that the kid in the story has to put to bed!

I thought I was ready for bedtime before PJ Storytime started, and by the end of the second one, I was sure ready to go home and get into my own PJs!

Advertisements

Mo Willems/iPad Storytime!

I did this one a while ago, but it’s still one of my favorites so I have to share!

IMG_8290

We read The Pigeon Wants a Puppy! and Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems, then we used Don’t Let the Pigeon Run This App! on the iPad, followed by a cute, simple Pigeon craft.

I wasn’t sure how it would go, but this app was so much fun to use in storytime that I ended up using it during my 4 Head Start visits the next day. It was a crowd pleaser, as it’s silly and interactive.

If you’re not familiar with this app, basically, the bus driver asks the reader a series of questions such as “What’s your name?” “What’s something that you think is really smelly?” “What’s your favorite snack” and so on. The app records your answers and inserts them mad lib-style into an original “Don’t Let the Pigeon….” story.

The kids loved answering the questions, then hearing their answers repeated as part of the silly, high-energy animated story.

This app is on the pricier side, at $5.99, but it is so much fun.

This was such a fun storytime with the elements of print books, the interactive app, and the craft time!

Earth Day Storytime: Seeds and Flowers!

For today’s Head Start visit (four classes each Wednesday!), I really liked these books for a seed and flower-themed storytime in celebration of Earth Day. I knew they’d already be talking about recycling, reusing, etc. all week at school, so I wanted to do something different yet related.

Seeds by Vijaya Khisty Bodach

I try to sneak in non-fiction books whenever I can, so I grabbed this one, and it was great for a preschool-age storytime. The text was very simple yet informative and conversation-provoking. I was even able to talk about poop when we got to the part about birds eating berries and the sees coming out “in their waste.” That’s the mark of an excellent storytime book, in my opinion. Poop.

Flower Garden by Eve Bunting

I love this book for storytime! For one, it’s full of diverse characters, which we know is a trait lacking in many picture books. Also, because the girl in the story lives in the city, we got to talk about the city’s tall buildings, lack of yard space, apartment living, different places to plant gardens, etc. The mention of birthday cake and chocolate ice cream at the end got the kids (and me, I’ll admit) a bit riled up, but that’s to be expected just before lunch time!

Flowers by Number by David Shapiro

I really liked this one for all of the information that it contained about when and where different flowers grow, plus the element of counting the flowers, petals, leaves, etc. ALSO, the counting in this book starts at zero, which I don’t see a lot but think should definitely be included in some counting books.